Friday, May 17, 2019

Nyusi concerned northern armed violence could spread


Mozambique’s president, Filipe Nyusi, fears that the armed violence that has swept over the north of the country for the past year and a half could spread..
“We are striving to ensure that everyone collaborates to see if we can discover the reason [for the armed groups], because this could spread”, he told Canal de Moçambique newspaper in his first interview since coming to power five years ago. Armed groups allegedly originating in mosques have killed at least 150 people in the northern province of Cabo Delgado over the last 18 months. “They attack the villages and they use the young and captured people. A significant number are foreigners. They cross the border, they come here, but when they are captured they are returned to their countries,” President Nyusi said. “There are times when there is talk of Islamic connotations, but it’s better that this not be used as a mask.” The task, he added, was to establish “the ringleader behind all this, and what the motivation is”. At the same time, Nyusi said that there was collaboration with the multinational companies investing in natural gas in the province “to protect economic assets”. In the same interview, the president said there probably could not have been any more misfortunes in his term of office.
Nyusicanalmoz3“I do not know if there are more misfortunes that could happen in this country than what happened to us in the last four and a half years,” he said.  In addition to the two violent cyclones that hit the country this year, there were the droughts in the south of the country, “the war that killed people” and “money that has not come in – we facing financial problems”.
Regarding the war, the guns were silenced by the ceasefire announced by Mozambican National Resistance (Renamo) guerrillas in December 2016. Filipe Nyusi reiterates that peace talks are slow and stalled over the names the opposition party has proposed regarding its disarmament and reintegration process.  To the point that Nyusi says he wonders if “Renamo wants to leave those people out there in the bush and take these people who are here in the city back [there]”.
“The impasse has nothing to do with the government. On the government side everything is easy,” he said, adding that the situation is “tiring” the mediators.
“Our foreign friends are already getting tired,” he said, a few days after he had asked Renamo to hand over its weapons before the general election scheduled for October 15.  Filipe Nyusi devoted much of the interview to appealing to the private sector to back agriculture and questioning how the time had been spent since independence.  “It’s true that it’s 40 years, but what kind of 40 years did Mozambique have? Forty years of fighting where one cannot maintain a thread of thought,” he said.

$95 billion of gas revenue over 25 years


Mozambique’s government expects to reap $95 billion of revenue over 25 years from natural-gas deposits being developed in the country — more than seven times larger than its gross domestic product. Exxon Mobil Corp.’s Rovuma LNG project, for which the cabinet approved the development plan this week, is expected to generate $46 billion of income for the state, according to a statement posted on the government’s website Thursday. That adds to the $49 billion of revenue anticipated from two other LNG projects being developed nearby by Eni SpA and Anadarko Petroleum Corp., it said in June. Exxon Mobil Corp.’s Rovuma LNG project, for which the cabinet approved the development plan this week, is expected to generate $46 billion of income for the state, according to a statement posted on the government’s website Thursday. That adds to the $49 billion of revenue anticipated from two other LNG projects being developed nearby by Eni SpA and Anadarko Petroleum Corp., it said in June.
Resultado de imagem para Mozambique expects $95 billion of gas revenue over 25 yearsThe liquefied-natural-gas projects the three companies plan to build in Cabo Delgado province will be transformational for the world’s sixth-poorest nation, which is still recovering from a civil war that ended in 1992. Mozambique’s GDP was less than $13 billion in 2017, according to the World Bank. Mozambique’s economy has also struggled since the government defaulted on $2 billion of debt in 2017,  the bulk of which the authorities hid from donors and the International Monetary Fund.
The government is in restructuring talks with holders of its $727 million Eurobonds, and has reached an early agreement to pay them 5% of its revenue from the Eni and Anadarko projects, up to a maximum $500 million. It has reached a similar preliminary deal with Russia’s VTB Capital for another of the loans that made up the $2 billion. The Rovuma project will cost about $23 billion to develop, according to the government statement. Standard Bank Group estimated in a March report that the Exxon project could cost as much as $33 billion.

$110 million in assistance to Mozambique


The U.S. and Mozambican governments signed today three development agreements totaling almost $110 million. Mission Director for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Jennifer Adams represented the U.S. Government, while Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation José Pacheco represented the Government of the Republic of Mozambique. These agreements provide $14 million in additional funding for USAID programs focused on accelerating resilient broad-based economic growth, $13.6 million to improve the quality of education, and $81.5 million to improve health systems and services.
PachecousaidWith these agreements, the U.S. Government will continue to build on its investments to help Mozambique achieve inclusive socioeconomic development for its people. With the amendments, USAID’s 2019 assistance investment in Mozambique now totals $288 million, supporting programs focused on malaria, maternal/child health, family planning, nutrition, tuberculosis, education, agriculture, biodiversity conservation, and water and sanitation. Over the past year alone, USAID’s current portfolio of programs provided more than 135,000 households with agriculture assistance, distributed 84,000 textbooks, and purchased 5.6 million malaria treatment kits.
During the signing ceremony, Dr. Adams said: “The signing of these agreements marks a joint U.S. – Mozambique commitment to ensuring equitable, sustainable development results for the Mozambican people. We believe every person, every community, and every country wants to be empowered to lead their own future. We support the Mozambican development journey as an enduring partner.”
Dr. Adams also recognised the incredible resilience that Mozambicans have shown in the response to Cyclones Idai and Cyclone Kenneth, and reaffirmed the U.S. Government’s continued commitment to recovery efforts. As the world’s largest donor of humanitarian assistance, the United States Government is investing significant resources to assist those affected by the cyclones that devastated central and northern Mozambique. As of May 1, USAID has provided over $67 million to support food, health care, nutrition, shelter, safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene assistance to people in cyclone-affected areas, working with the Mozambican National Institute of Disaster Management (INGC) and a variety of international partners to provide food and other assistance to over a million people.